Immigrants

[Working with Immigrants] Working with Hispanic Adult Children with Immigrant Parents (Part 3)

Working with Hispanic Adult Children with Immigrant Parents

Implications
When I planned to write this series of articles, I didn’t plan to make it so complicated and so long! This section has always been my plan. I want to share with you about my experiences to take these adult children’s narrative into individual and couple therapy.

Continue reading “[Working with Immigrants] Working with Hispanic Adult Children with Immigrant Parents (Part 3)”

Immigrants

[Working with Immigrants] Working with Hispanic Adult Children with Immigrant Parents (Part II)

Working with Hispanic Adult Children with Immigrant Parents

I was planning to write this section starting with Chinese immigrant. Along the way, the Hispanic population took over. It is not because Hispanics are the # 1 minority population. It is because I can identify my parents and myself in these adult children.

Language
My grandparents were born right after the World War 1 and lived under the Japanese colony their young adult life. My mother was born the year when the World War 2 ended. To live under the Japanese colony as a Taiwanese was difficult. It was also hard for my parents who grew up in the country when the entire world was in the process of recovery postwar. Continue reading “[Working with Immigrants] Working with Hispanic Adult Children with Immigrant Parents (Part II)”

Immigrants

[Working with Immigrants] Working with Hispanic Adult Children with Immigrant Parents (Part I)

Working with Hispanic Adult Children with Immigrant Parents

Immigrants tend to move to the places where they have their relatives or families. For example, the city of Lowell has a huge Vietnamese, Cambodian, and Laos population. The city of Lawrence also is central of the Hispanic population. My office located next to Lawrence and 10 miles from the city of Lowell. Being an Asian immigrant myself, I found myself getting clients from these two population quite often. However, because I don’t speak Vietnamese, Khmer, and Spanish, most of the clients from these countries are the first generation of the immigrant family who either immigrated here very young or was born here.

Therefore, my disclaimer here is that my working experiences with the Hispanic population are primary the adult children with immigrant parents. Let’s start with the Hispanic population.

The assessment questions were developed in the process of working with these children who speak both perfect English and native language. Other than discussing with my clients about these questions, I also research the history of the country of origin as part of my homework after the first intake session.

Let me start with the Hispanic population. Continue reading “[Working with Immigrants] Working with Hispanic Adult Children with Immigrant Parents (Part I)”